MUSIC SUPERVISORS: EVERYWHERE ALL THE TIME

So you want to place your music in movies and on the television no matter where it is watched these days. And you come up with a song that is awesome. What do you do?

Why, naturally you blast out that song via email and social media, and hand out CDs and jump drives to everybody in the music business, everybody who says they are in the business, everybody who says they know somebody in the business, and all of their brothers, mothers, sisters, fathers, uncles, spouses, ex-whatevers, and next door neighbors.

You say some version of the following: “Here is a song that will make us a ton of money. Nothing like it…ever. Everybody, and I mean EVERYBODY, will like it. It fits in every show (and I can show you how!) and it works for every character (and I can show you how!) and it will make your show a hit with everybody and I mean EVERYBODY. Rock on, dude. When will I expect a check?”

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Most of you reading this get that I am totally exaggerating, even being a bit sarcastic, and in that exaggeration and sarcasm am making a point. You’re chuckling and saying to yourself you’d never do such a thing as that. I say, great; that’s awesome.

But some of you, and this is what is sad, do believe that’s how to do it because you heard So-and-So got his break that way and look how rich he is now. Bless your hearts. Scenarios such as that are called the Exceptions That Prove the Rule.

Still, the question is legitimate. How do you let anyone know your song is available?

You’ve probably done research online and, if you’re like most, you’re reading a ton of Tips, Hints, and “Surefire Never Fail Inside Information Guaranteed to Get You PLACED”!

These tips, hints, and “SNFIIGtGYPs”, often seem to muddy the waters of the process. I understand; I’ve read them; I get it.

But in February 2014, I had opportunity to be in front of one of three music supervisors for a popular network chock full of reality and scripted programming, all of which need music.

I’ve been in pitch sessions before, but this man, Paul Logan, had a logical way of explaining why he needed what he needed, how to gauge if a song fit his specific parameters, what his responsibility toward you is (and that he will keep it), and how to get his attention.

But first, let’s see YOU from his point of view.

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